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TEA and CATO

May 13, 2010
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A couple of weeks ago, the CATO Institute released a video on YouTube offering advice to the TEA Party movement.  Reaction has been mixed.  I suppose that’s to be expected, since many of the people involved in the TEA Parties are essentially non-political.  They’ve never been involved in politics before.  They aren’t career activists.  They’ve been gathering together because they share the beliefs that taxes are too high and their way of life is being threatened.  But they all have differing concepts of the American way of life; a variety of potentially conflicting social views.

Most of the Tea Partiers probably aren’t aware of the nature and political sophistication of their opponents.  Those opponents – a cadre of collectivists, elitists, and anti-industrialists – have been around for generations.  They have the advantage of experience, a century of scheming against liberty and the free market, that they’ll use against the TEA Partiers.

So far, they’ve failed to create the illusion that the TEA Parties are violent, racist extremists.  Don’t think that they’ll just give up though.  The next step is to divide the movement through social issues, including sex, race, religion, marriage, income.  Anywhere they can,  they’ll try to drive a wedge.

If the TEA Party movement is to survive, they have to resist getting bogged down in those irrelevant issues, regardless of how strongly they believe in them.  When I say “irrelevant,” I don’t mean those issues are unimportant.  They just won’t make any difference when your individual liberty is gone.  If they continue to rally around their common goals of lower taxes, less spending, limited government and individual liberty, the TEA Parties will succeed.  If they don’t, they will fail.

And remember all politicians must be held accountable, regardless of party.  A big spending Republican is as dangerous as a big spending Democrat.  They both increase the scope and power of government in your life.   Switch parties and defeat big spending incumbents in their primaries, if you have to. Demand that candidates pledge to do more than just cut spending.  Demand that they cut entire programs.  Demand that they relinquish power back to the state governments, local governments and individual citizens.  If they fail to do these things, VOTE THEM OUT.  Repeat as necessary.

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